Back To The Future

In 30, 40, 50 years’ time, will the nostalgia and passion for classic cars remain? Rare Spares Directors Les McVeigh and Lance Corby got together with Rare Spares ambassador John Bowe to share their opinions and insights into where classic cars will fit into our future. 

In a world of rapidly advancing automotive technology, will true classics eventually die out? or will modern cars of the 80s and 90’s take their place? At what point might Australians stop restoring the cars they grew up with? Will there come a time when it becomes too technically difficult for the average car enthusiast to restore modern cars with high levels of electronics?

“I think there’ll always be an interest in classic cars, always. Where it stops, in my opinion would be when they start to get very complicated,” said John Bowe.

“Nowadays I think there is more interest in classic cars than there ever has been.”

Looking only 30-40 years ahead, Lance Corby envisions a future where classic cars remain, some from the 90’s, but many older vehicles as well. 

 “In 40 years’ time, there will still be people with classic cars on the road. Regardless of what future cars become, there will always be a percentage of people wanting something unique.”

How old does a car need to be before it holds nostalgic memories for certain owners? In 2050, will people born in the 90’s be fondly remembering the cars we’re driving today? Which models will be remembered fondly and which will be discarded?

“The rarer ones will still be the most valuable, because rarity is what drives the prices,” said John.

“Certainly I think cars of the 80’s and possibly the 90’s will become classics for years to come. I’m thinking the EB, EL, EF Falcons and similar type Commodores.”

Les believes that the VR Commodore will be one of the last models to ever be considered a classic as well as the HSV models. Two cars the Directors could both could agree on were the Holden Monaro V2, VZ 2001-2005 and Ford GT Falcon, FPV GT (produced by Ford Performance Vehicles).

“I don’t see many newer Fords that fit the profile for classic cars, but we’re still going to have the older Ford GT’s and Holden Monaros that will never be in production here again. For anyone wanting a classic Australian vehicle that will retain its value, they’ll probably be the two most popular models,” said Les. 

“The demise of Australian built Holdens and Fords will make those cars a lot more desirable, while the later model Ford and Holden imports won’t be as collectable.”

“I think we’re a nation that’s quite proud of our motoring heritage and there’s always going to be a market for the original Australian classics,” said John.

Beyond the 90’s, automotive technology has continued to advance, with hybrid technology and the move towards electric cars and vehicles that can park themselves.

If the cars of today and tomorrow were to one day become classics, aftermarket suppliers like Rare Spares would have a hard task at hand, replicating the advanced technology.

“Once they get into the new millennium, say the 2000’s on, cars become more and more complicated,” John said.

When asked if Rare Spares will adapt and eventually be producing electronic car parts, Lance said, “I don’t think so. We may, but there’s already a lot of aftermarket electronics for cars available. I don’t think we would ever be in the game of manufacturing that type of technology.”

On the future role of mechanics being likened to software engineers, he added “It’s certainly going to become a big part of their industry, but the skill set of your basic mechanic will always be needed; An engine’s still an engine. A long way down the track when you’ve got your electric cars and so on - that will change a lot of things, but our current cars still have almost all of the same components that the cars of yesterday had.”

“I don’t think that modern technology will ever stop the average Joe Blow from restoring a car in his backyard.”

Tell us what you think will be considered a classic in the future by emailing Amy at adixon@rarespares.net.au

 

Picnic At Hanging Rock Car Show

6. May 2014 13:44 by Rare Spares in Rare Spares  //  Tags: , ,   //   Comments (0)

On Sunday May 4th the Rare Spares sponsored 27th annual Picnic at Hanging Rock event, run by the Macedon Ranges and District Motor Club.

Despite the cold weather, many vintage, classic, restored, modified and veteran vehicles including cars, trucks and motorcycles were on display, making the event one of Victoria’s largest one day motoring events.

Trade stands, displays, refreshments and kid’s entertainment all added to the festival atmosphere on the day.

Rare Spares were out in full force with two marquees and product displays, supported by two promotional girls who spread the word about Rare Spares $200 voucher give away, and Ambassador John Bowe was there to congratulate the winner.

Rare Spares are strong supporters of Australian Car Clubs and it was fantastic to see how many came down for the day!

If you have some pictures from the day that you’d like to share with us, send them to Amy at adixon@rarespares.net.au.

 

Word from a Winner – Exclusive VIP Experience at the Clipsal 500

7. April 2014 12:15 by Rare Spares in   //  Tags: , , , ,   //   Comments (0)

Mitchell, the winner of the Rare Experience promotion, had a chat to us about his VIP experience at the Clipsal 500.


For those of you who don’t remember, the Rare Experience promotion ran from the 3rd to the 5th of January at Summernats, offering one lucky winner + a friend, the whole motorsport package:

  • Return flights from your nearest capital city
  • 2 nights’ accommodation
  • General admission & pit lane access for the weekend
  • To be hosted by John Bowe & his racing team for the weekend including a dinner

Mitchell took his Father along for the weekend and raved about the experience.


“I had such a great weekend and I would love to do it again. Big thanks to Rare Spares, David Rayner, Amy Rayner, Hamilton (JB’s manger) and John Bowe for the great weekend and the experience dad and I enjoyed,”
he said.


“Adelaide is a very nice place to stay and the hotel Rare Spares set up was wonderful. The dinner with John Bowe, David Rayner and Hamilton was great and we laughed a lot and got to learn a little more about the category JB is racing in.”


“We got to do so much more then we were expecting, like the tour of Jason Bright’s pit and car. It felt like we were part of the team being able to go into pit lane as John Bowe lined up to race.


“Dad and I couldn't stop smiling the whole weekend and we couldn't believe how many great activities we got to do. Big thanks again, couldn't be happier with how the weekend went.”


Rare Spares offer our valued customers many promotional opportunities each year to win money-can’t-buy experiences, gift vouchers and more.


You can enter our current photo competition by sending in a pic of your restoration project or daily drive, for the chance to win a Rare Spares voucher! To enter click here.  

 

We Want Your Car!

We want to hear from you, our loyal fans with photos of what you’re restoring or even just your proud daily drive!

In some way, shape or form Rare Spares is more than just a part in your project and we want to see what’s hiding in your garages or you are cruising on the streets!

For six weeks we’ll be accepting photos of your pride and joy and selecting three vehicles to post on our Facebook page each fortnight.

By the end of each fortnight, the photo with the most likes will win either a $50 Rare Spares voucher or a mystery prize. We’ll also be giving away a prize to one lucky person who has liked one of the photos, as well as a $200 Rare Spares voucher to the photo with the most likes overall!

 

Just tell us what you drive and send in the best picture you have. If your car is selected, the more friends and family that ‘like’ your picture, the better chance you have of winning some cool prizes.                                                                                                                   

 

Full competition details and to enter CLICK HERE 

 

Also, If you have an interesting build story or a classic restoration or relevant feature car, we are looking for stories in our next e-newsletter so tell us all about your project!

 

Rare Spares, More Than Just A Part In Your Project

 

The Future Of The Auto Industry Down Under

We spoke to Rare Spares Ambassador and Racing Legend, John Bowe about the future of the automotive industry in Australia and the end of Australian car manufacturing.

“I wouldn’t class myself as an expert, but I’ve had a full motoring life and I think it’s quite sad that we’re not going to have any manufacturing here anymore, because some of the cars that Ford and Holden have produced have been seriously iconic Australian cars,” said Bowe.

“All these problems started years and years ago and have been perpetuated by the following governments, so it was inevitable that this was going to happen.”

"Once Holden and Ford have declared their hands, Toyota ultimately wouldn’t have any choice, because the fringe industries which unfortunately are going to suffer a great deal of job loss, can’t sustain with one manufacturer. It’s like a stack of cards unfortunately. I have a lot of compassion for the people involved.”

“It’s my opinion that there will still be growth in the Australian car market and companies such as Ford and Holden and Toyota will become more profitable.”

“There will still be an aftermarket. In the last five to seven  years there has been a bit of a change in our culture about which type of cars we drive. We have a massive choice of cars in Australia, so the aftermarket will always be there. It’s a changing scene for sure, but there will always be an aftermarket.”

“Rare Spares will probably see some growth, because cars that have been Australian and have a place in people’s hearts will be being restored more, so I can see this market going up.”

“I think the tariff will probably stay as it is. I can’t see much changing, except for higher unemployment rates. The government is charged with developing other industries that these people can be employed in.”

The car industry isn’t going to be there anymore and it makes me sad, but I’m not surprised.”

 “The level of interest in restorations now is increasing because everyone that loves cars realises that we aren’t going to have Australian Falcon’s or Commodores, and the cars of the 80’s are now going to become restorable.”

“Where it used to be the 50’s and 60’s and then slowly became the 70’s, this is going to bring forward the 80’s cars like the XE Falcons and VK Commodores. People will be restoring them because they are part of our history.”